Still have questions? Learn more about your bill, safety, efficiency and overall savings just by switching to natural gas.

The Daily Access Charge covers the costs of making gas service available to our customers (other utilities sometimes call this a “customer charge”). The amount varies monthly because it’s based on the number of days between meter readings. Whether or not natural gas is actually used during the billing period, Vermont Gas incurs costs to make the service available, including:

  • Connection costs: Installing and maintaining the service line from the street to your meter.
  • Metering costs: Buying, installing, maintaining and reading the meter.
  • Billing costs: Preparing, recording and sending a bill.

The Distribution Charge covers the cost of constructing, operating and maintaining the Vermont Gas pipeline system. The charge is based on the metered volume of gas. Five types of costs are reflected in the Distribution Charge:

  • Pipeline Distribution System: Construction, ownership and financing of the Vermont Gas pipeline system, which transports and distributes gas from the Canadian border to almost 50,000 customers throughout Northwest Vermont.
  • Operations & Maintenance: Running a safe and reliable operation and maintaining the Vermont Gas pipeline system, including 24/7 monitoring and coverage. Safety measures include meter testing and remediation, pipeline and meter inspections and educating the public about the safe use of natural gas.
  • Taxes: Payments to Federal, State and City/Town governments in the form of property taxes, gross receipt taxes and income taxes.
  • Finance & Administration: General operating costs, such as accounting and finance, regulatory and other administrative costs.

The Natural Gas Charge is the cost of supplying natural gas. The charge is based on the metered volume of gas. There are four components to the cost of natural gas:

  • Commodity costs: The wholesale cost of the natural gas.
  • Pipeline transportation to Vermont: Transporting natural gas from the production areas in Canada to Vermont.
  • Storage costs: Storing gas in the summer to be withdrawn during winter.
  • Peaking costs: Reserving extra supplies to serve customers on the coldest (highest demand) days of the year.

The Energy Efficiency Charge is the cost to cover our Energy Efficiency Programs. This charge is based on the metered volume of gas and covers the following:

  • Financial Incentives on installation of weatherization measures.
  • Rebates on the purchase and installation of high efficient heating systems.

The Assistance Program Fee funds Vermont Gas’ Low Income Assistance Program (LIAP).  The fee is a per meter, per bill charge, and funds the LIAP program that provides a 20% discount to income-eligible residential customers.  

The difference is significant. Take sulfur dioxide, the main contributor to acid rain. Oil emits 1,122 pounds per billion Btu’s; natural gas, 0.6 pounds.

Natural gas also emits far less carbon dioxide and far fewer particulates than oil. And with natural gas, you won’t have to worry about fuel seeping into the earth, or your basement, from a leaky tank.

If you’d like to cut down on greenhouse gas emissions, replacing dirtier fuels with natural gas can help.

Many propane grills are easily converted to natural gas, and some models can be purchased natural-gas ready.

It’s quite true that gas fireplaces with pilot lights will keep operating without electricity. Sales of these fireplaces soared after the ice storm of 1998!

You should look for a fireplace that’s rated as a space-heating appliance with an Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) of approximately 80% or better.

If you need more guidance on purchasing equipment, call or email us.

The Daily Access is a portion of our rates that helps cover the costs of delivering natural gas to you, such as maintaining service lines to your building, meter reading and monthly billing. This amount is approved by the Public Service Board.

You may notice a slight variation of this charge from month to month. Because it is a daily charge, it reflects the number of days in a billing period. Normally a billing period covers 28 to 32 days.

Absolutely not! Electric heat tape uses a lot of energy. And worse, it can be a fire hazard. There is almost always a better way to deal with freezing pipes.

If your plumber or contractor recommends electric heat tape, be concerned. Call us for a list of insulation specialists.

It’s best to look at the big picture of energy usage. Many houses have a mixed bag of energy sources for heat and appliances — an electric water heater, natural gas or oil heating, an electric stove, a propane gas grill.

Statistics show that the most cost-efficient situation you can have is an all-natural-gas house. Using natural gas for everything — heat, hot water, cooking and clothes drying — will save you money.

Call us for a free estimate of how much you can save by converting to natural gas.